Gervais on Success

Ricky Gervais

Test Marketing

I recommend this 12 minute Harvard Business Review podcast with Ricky Gervais. These are the parts that stuck out for me.

First, he agrees with me about awards.

The awards.  They’re a thrill. But, deep down, I know its only the opinions of a few people and it doesn’t matter whether you win or lose.

I’ve often been amazed at how awards are generally accepted as some great honor, when many times they’re a results of nothing more politics.  If you follow any awards like the Nobel Prize or even the Oscars, ask yourself what you really know about the people making the selection.  How and why is their criteria better than ours’?

Gervais continues on what he thinks is important:

What matters is the work you did. You tried your hardest and you’re proud of it.  You brought something into the world.  That’s the important thing.

I don’t try to please anyone except myself.  And if people like what I do, that’s fantastic.  If they don’t like it, then that’s good too.  If you start to try to water it down or second guess people, you end up with something so safe and homogenized that a lot of people will like, but they won’t love it.

I’ve always wanted to rather do something that really moved a million people then washes over 10 million.

I think that’s an extremely important insight.  Many successful organizations who have established their million fans make the mistake of trying too hard to expand to 10 million to find out that they’ve lost their million fans and aren’t that well liked by the other 9 million people.  I’d rather keep the million and find something else that works for another million.

I like the following because I think many successful people have their collaborators that we hear very little about.  Buffett has Munger, for instance.  Vince has E.

These are the no bullshit people.  That means these guys are tight enough with the Talent that they don’t blow smoke up the Talent’s bohunkus just to earn a spot in the entourage.  And the Talent trusts, values and appreciates their opinion — though they may not always agree.

Gervais explains how his collaboration with Stephen Merchant works.

It helps with two people.  Two heads are better than one.  But, there’s a compromise, which is bad. The best things are a single vision. So, you got to find a single vision between the two of you.

One, it’s luck.  Out of 6 billion people, I bumped into someone who sees eye-to-eye on 90 percent on everything we talk about.

He and Merchant have a golden rule.  One veto and it’s out.  No justification or compromise.  It just goes.

So, what you end up with the compromise is that every second of that thing, you both love it.

I love how Gervais appreciates the luck of finding a good collaborator.  I see so many people who I believe could be much more successful if only that could find those people they hit it off with.

I liked this bit about how he gets his material because it ties in with the experimentation and crowd sourcing themes that I write about on this blog frequently:

The things I work up on my own, it’s an evolution.  It’s a process of natural selection.  So the audience chooses the best bits.  They either laugh or they don’t.

So, if I do something that isn’t funny, they don’t laugh and it doesn’t survive.

If I say something that is funny, it’s funny every time.

What you’re left with at the end of a series of gigs is a survival of the fittest.  It’s the best gene pool that I could come up with.

So, I’ve got a room full of 10,000 collaborators and critics.

I’ve found the same thing with business presentations.  The best presentation I do on a new subject is about the fifth time I’ve presented the material, because I try a variety of things to illustrate a point and I keep the stuff that worked in presentations one through four and drop the stuff that didn’t.  And it works.

That’s why it’s always good to find practice audiences, have a keen eye for body language and learn how to cull out honest feedback.

Finally, on dealing with the fact not everything is for everybody and his inspiration.

I just do things that make me laugh and I always think that if I do something that genuinely makes me laugh, with no ulterior motive other than ‘that’s funny’, then there will be someone else in the world that finds it as funny as me.

And with 6 billion people in the world, there’s probably quite a few people who find it as funny as me.

And, that’ll do for me. That really will do.