Sometimes free is too expensive

This post from a teacher on Instapundit reminded me of my Education: It Doesn’t Need to be One-Size-Fits-All post from 2010.

This part is a good example of what I meant that the preferences of the experts who set K-12 standards are not necessarily the preferences of everyone:

The only reason that the 60% of the kids who bothered to show up daily even came to school was for the 2 free meals and the climate control. We needed a force of 15 security people to keep the kids IN CLASS. They had no desire to learn. They did not CARE if they failed. I never, ever had kids who started at my school as 9th graders and had enough credits to be juniors by their third year. Most didn’t even have enough credits to be sophomores. And this was when summer school was free!

Granted…this is summer school.

There are some thought-provoking nuggets embedded in here. Why didn’t they care if they failed? Why didn’t they have a desire to learn? I think it’s because they believe they can get by without learning what’s taught in school. They don’t value the college prep value prop like the “experts” who designed the curriculum and most of the U.S. that has been brainwashed that a college prep education is the only way to go.

Something is broke if 15 security people are needed to keep the kids in the classroom. The disruptive kids need to be sent home. Let the parents figure out what to do with them. But, the incentives are against that. If the school sends those kids home, they won’t get money from the state. My guess is that the school district comes out ahead financially by paying for security and collecting the money for attendance rather than sending half the kids home.