Felix Dennis Tidbits

Here are a few final bookmarks from Felix Dennis’s How to Get Rich.  I highly recommend the book, even if you don’t wish to get rich.  It’s easy to read and contains a lot of wisdom that can help you in various parts of your life.

On luck, first-mover myth and tunnel vision (p. 142):

The only truth about luck, good or bad, is that it will change.  The law of averages virtually guarantees it.  And here, I think, is one difference that separates me from my “unlucky” friend, whom I shall call Albert.

By moving so adroitly and so swiftly from one thing to the next, Albert does not place himself in the way of luck.  He is too much in love with the green, green grass just over the hill.

Then again, Albert is more intelligent than I am.  But there is a downside to all this intelligence and imagination.  He thinks a little too much before he acts.  He weighs the options too carefully. He is capable of imagining defeat.

So while he is clever enough to want to minimize his risk by switching to yet another new and uncontested marketplace, he leads himself into uncertainty. And into error.

Uncontested markets are usually uncontested for a reason. Nature abhors a vacuum and if no one else is contesting a market, it may well be that no such market exists.

There are other differences between Albert and me.  He is a great believer in partnering and share options and employee profit participation.  …in Albert’s case, this division of the spoils is undertaken in the minutest detail, long before there are any profits whatever to share.  Albert believes they encourage his coworkers. But such arrangements are immensely time-consuming and a distraction from the tunnel vision necessary to become rich in the first place.

On negotiation and politics (p. 149):

If you are overly fond of haggling, my advice is that you quit thinking about making money the old-fashioned way and consider becoming a politician instead.  That way you can rob and plunder your fellow citizens year after year without risking your own financial security or capital–you bastard. (By the way, please get used to people thinking of you as a bastard.  After all, it’s what nearly everyone thinks of politicians, except themselves).

On management (p. 150):

All great companies, all well-run organizations, need great managers and great staff.  That much, at least, is pretty obvious.  You forget it at your peril.

But the acquisition of of managers who can bring a sense of mission to even mundane tasks, who can identify potential candidates, nurture late bloomers, fire dullards and whiners and adapt to changing circumstances–that searching, identifying and nurturing is not about negotiating.  It’s about setting an example of true meritocracy in a company where nepotism hasn’t a chance and where those who wish to succeed are given every opportunity and encouragement to do so.

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