Good discussion about true competition on the 3Four3 podcast

Guest Ben Fast and host John Pranjic have a great discussion about the nature true competition that is lacking in soccer in the U.S. and the role of governance in this 3Four3 podcast.

It would make Austrian and George Mason University economists proud.

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Glass half full

The last few weeks we’ve heard a lot of comparisons of the pay and money brought in by the Women’s World Cup and the Men’s World Cup.

But, there’s no mention on how the $130 million brought in by the Women’s World Cup compares to other women sporting events.

I can’t think of any that could come close to that.

Major tennis tournaments and the Olympics probably come close if you break out the female sporting events, but that’s tough to do.

My guess is the Women’s World Cup is the most valuable female-only sporting event and it continues to grow, which are good signs that don’t seem to get noticed.

Why not ask broadcasters and advertisers why they spend less on the Women’s World Cup?

I’m a fan of women’s soccer. I think they deserve as much as they can get.

But, I think many pin the unequal pay blame on the wrong folks.

The 2018 World Cup (men’s version) brought in about $5 billion.

The 2019 World Cup (women’s version) is expected to bring in about $130 million.

This easy to find fact doesn’t get much coverage.

If it did, a good reporter might recognize that the pay gap primarily originates from how much broadcasters are willing to pay to secure the rights to carry the respective tournaments and ask network executives why they spend less on rights to the Women’s tournament.

Of course, the answer would be that they make less in advertising off of that programming.

That same reporter could then ask the marketing execs at the tournament’s advertisers why they spend less.

Nike would be a good place to start.

They produced an inspiring commercial to cap off the World Cup. But, nobody asked them how what they spent in 2019 compares to what they spent in 2018.

Perhaps they spent the same.

If not, they get a lot of credit for bringing attention to the pay gap while avoiding blame for contributing to it.

Yes. Free Play Soccer.

I enjoyed this 3Four3 podcast with Ted Kroeten.

He talks about what he has discovered with free play and soccer for kids, through his Joy of the People, that organizes free play with kids.

Here are some quotables from the pod:

“Play early, learn late.” Sums up that young kids learn more playing with each other than having coaches direct them.

In terms of learning the sport: “The best soccer is closest to home. Playing in your basement is better than your backyard. Play in your backyard is better than your local park. Play in your local park is better than your local club. Play your local club is better than a travel team.”

“I cannot teach better than free play can deliver at the young ages.”

“Some of the things we discovered from free play. Feedback is inappropriate. Feedback between kids on the field is totally appropriate. Feedback from coaches is not. Telling kids to work on things, their weaknesses, is not appropriate. Letting kids understand what they can and cannot do from each other is totally appropriate.

While listening to this last quote, I thought back to the times where I could have been quiet. What kept me from being quiet? Parents expected me to coach, not be quiet. There were games where I was quiet and it wouldn’t be long before I’d hear that I wasn’t coaching.

Ted has thought about free play deeply and sees the complexities of the learning, copying from each other, and subtle forms for feedback that simply can’t be replicated in team practice.

In one spot he mentioned how a kid might learn that if he doesn’t pass to a player, then that player may not put in as much effort on defense later.

Or, when he was left behind on his local hockey team when his buddies moved to a travel team and he selfishly taught the others how to play better hockey so he could have some challenging competition.

The host, John Pranjic, recalled a time at a similar free play experiment that 3Four3 ran where the kids couldn’t solve the simplest things like picking teams or setting out cones because they were so used to adults doing all that for them.

I’ve had similar experiences coaching soccer. I recall a time warming up before a game when we told the players to get into 4v1’s. In one group, every kid had a ball. In another group, nobody had a ball.

Neither group was making any headway to get to one ball.

All stood waiting for us to tell them what to do. The other coach said, “Guys, if we have to tell you how to get one ball per group, we’re in trouble. Solve the problem!”

It wasn’t that these kids couldn’t solve such problems. They just didn’t have the free play experience in soccer and we’re use to doing what adults told them.

Around the same time, I watched these same kids organize free play in baseball, basketball and football. They could pick balanced teams, set up the field or court, and make other equalizing adjustments that selfishly kept everyone playing longer without any adult intervention, all learned from free play in those sports.

Help for beginning volunteer youth soccer coaches

Albert Einstein said, “The definition of genius is taking the complex and making it simple.”

Like many parents who know nothing about soccer, I got the call from the Parks & Rec coordinator to ask to coach soccer.

I was dumb enough to agree to it. “If you don’t, there are 12 kids that won’t get to play soccer this season.”

The biggest gripe I had as a beginning coach was the lack of resources geared toward beginning coaches and practical advice to help newbies teach soccer fundamentals to beginning players.

I searched high and low and felt that 95% of the stuff I found was superficial and lacked detail on coaching points. It was “do this and kids will figure it out.”

Or, it was all over the board. There’s large disagreement, even among soccer insiders, on what soccer fundamentals are important to work on at what age and order of learning.

Luckily, over the years, I encountered a few folks who, in my opinion have met Albert Einstein’s definition of genius — they took the complex and made it simple.

I thought I would share their resources in this post in case there are any parent/coaches out there, like myself, searching for help.

Inspire love for the ball

Nobody summarizes the importance of becoming a master of the ball or how to inspire it better than Tom Byer in his book, Soccer Starts at Home.

It’s a short book and easy read. It will take you a couple hours to read it. Read it. Encourage the parents of your players to do the same.

Build the basics 

Beginning soccer players, like the beginners of anything, need to develop the basics.

I wish I would have encountered Tom Mura’s Coaching Soccer Weekly podcast earlier in my coaching career.

His podcast touches on a wide range of topics and are more detailed than most beginning coaches need, but a few should be required listening for new coaches — with and without a soccer background.

I love the simple phrases he uses to teach the basics. For example, instead of “receive across your body” like many coaches say, we says, “receive with your back foot,” which is far easier for young kids to understand.

Here are a few of his podcasts I wish I would have heard in my first season coaching:

#182 Teaching the Five Core Soccer Skills

#178 What to work on with U8’s

#60 Coaching In Short Phrases

Work with teammates

Another genius simplicity is in the free coaching course offered at 3Four3.com.

The whole course is good, but it all won’t be too much for beginners. But, the one activity you can and should get kids started on early is their version of the 4v1 monkey-in-the-middle game (or start with 4v0 until kids can pass).

Less is more

Another thing the folks above taught me is that less is more. You don’t need 100s of activities. You only need a handful and some variations of those.

Some fall in the trap of lots of activities to keep kids from getting bored. But, kids also like familiarity. And familiarity takes less time to set up and transition and can lead to deeper learning.

The function of soccer culture

In each episode of John Pranjic’s 3Four3 soccer podcast he plugs 3Four3’s coaching training program.

One of his best selling-points for their coaching program is that helps coaches get past the “trial-and-error discovery phase” of figuring out what activities work and getting right to activities and coaching points that will make a difference in the players and team.

While writing the previous two posts, it dawned on me that soccer culture serves the same function for individual players.

Becoming a competent player from scratch has two has two general periods:

A. 2-5 year period of trial-and-error of learning about soccer and what’s important. This phase is filled with dead-ends, traps and road blocks. One example is simply underestimating the importance of ball skills.

B. 3-5 year period of developing competency on basic skills like first touch, dribbling and passing.

Soccer culture is a shortcut past the first period, because the culture has already discovered what’s important and made it possible to achieve that with activities that develop the basics in fun, unorganized activities with nobody noticing.

In baseball culture, we know one such activity as “catch”. Examples in basketball are 1-on-1, OUT and 21.

Soccer culture activities include juggling, monkey-in-the-middle and 1v1 to 3v3.

In addition to being played in unorganized settings, it’s with people ranging in age and ability, which enables knowledge transfer between generations and ability levels that doesn’t occur in organized settings sliced by age and ability levels.

In the U.S. soccer culture, it’s typical for kids to learn how to self-organize and enjoy playing a game of monkey-in-the-middle (which develops about 60% of the basic skills useful in soccer) in their teens.

In stronger soccer cultures, kids learn to play this on their own and have fun as early as age 5. And they play it a lot.

High School soccer stunts passing of soccer culture to the next generation

This is a continuation of my previous post on how high school soccer hurts soccer culture in U.S.

I have nothing against high school soccer. It’s just that an outcome is that hurts, rather than helps, making connections between younger and older players.

Those connections are vital to help pass on soccer culture.

Clubs in soccer playing countries foster these connections since high school age players play for the club’s senior teams, practice on the same grounds and coach younger players (which also helps keep costs down).

Kids in these clubs want to watch their coaches play on the weekend and play like them. While their current results matter, they also want to become like their coaches.

Younger players in the U.S. don’t have this extended view benchmark of where they want to go. They just have current results.

This hit home when one of my players ran into the local pro indoor team practicing at a field that we often practiced on, by accident. We moved practice that day, but that player’s Dad didn’t get the email.

We had attended some of their games to help spark an interest among kids, so he knew of them and was surprised and excited to to see a pro team practicing there.

His Dad introduced him to the GK, the GK gave him his gloves and he became that kid’s hero. His Dad bought season tickets and took every chance to see the GK again at fan events and training camps the team offered.

That player was one of the 4 players who regularly played GK on my team. They were all about the same level of ability and were content with that.

Over the next year, that player excelled. His “goalposts” had moved from being good enough on our team to playing like his hero and that made all the difference.

I recall the first game where he made a diving save and how much he looked like his favorite goalkeeper while he was doing it.

Of all the players I took to HS, college and pro matches hoping to spark an interest in how the game is played at higher levels, that was the one success story that that I know of.

The rest of the kids complained about how boring it was.

The difference was the connection that kid had made by accident. Knowing someone on the field made it a whole more interesting to him.

Imagine if all the kids could make that kind of connection.

Consider how far it sets us back that our system doesn’t foster such connections, while countries with strong soccer cultures do.