What’s the difference between competitive and rec soccer

As I was learning soccer, I had a tough time telling the difference between rec and competitive. But, I finally learned.

For competitive players, organized soccer is a small part of their soccer world. They’ve learned 5-30% of what they know about soccer in organized soccer. The rest comes from home, friends and their own interest.

For rec players, organized soccer makes up 80-100% of their soccer world.

Soccer clubs package and sell rec soccer as competitive soccer to parents, so a lot of kids are playing rec soccer, but think they are playing competitive.

Parents can’t tell the difference. Same uniforms, backpacks, cleats, officials, soccer fields, coaches, trophies and costs. The coaches have the same licenses and probably played college or semi-pro, somewhere, even if you never heard of the college or team.

What is different is what is played on the field.

In rec ball, most of the game is 50/50s, turnovers and incomplete passes.

This results from lacking the basic skills of trapping, dribbling and passing the ball because rec players only have a fraction of the cumulative repetition they need to build the muscle memory and foot-eye coordination to be competent since they rarely practice on their own.

In competitive, most of the game is the team working together to keep the ball with high pass completion and building on basic passing patterns and working into more complex patterns to try to get a shot.

This results from players being competent with trapping, dribbling and passing the ball because they have enough cumulative reps in their lifetime to have built the muscle memory and coordination.

There is much more to soccer than these three skills, but you need these to get there and rec players never can get there because they can’t do these three things.

Imagine baseball if the players can’t catch or throw. Imagine basketball if the players can’t catch, dribble or pass. It would look like much of ‘competitive’ (expensive rec) soccer in the U.S.

Rec players are the players I wrote about in the previous post. They fell in love with playing, but never fell in love with the ball. There’s nothing wrong with that, but if all they want to do is show up and play, save yourself time and money and keep them playing in the local rec league.

The good news is, from my perspective, the effort to become a competitive player isn’t immense. It’s amazing what some practice can do.

The bad news is that rec players won’t do it.

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