The 5 And’s

Young goalkeepers often lose confidence when they let a goal in. It doesn’t help that their teammates often blame the goal on them.

To help them regain confidence and teach their teammates that goals against are rarely the sole fault of the keeper, I would explain the 5 And’s.

They would respond, confused, “Five what?”

“Five And’s. Let’s replay what led up to that goal.

Johnny lost the ball because nobody was open for a pass…

AND…

Johnny then dove in to try to win the ball back (poor tackling technique), getting beat easily giving up 20 yards of space…

AND…

The next two defenders, Mike and Jack, didn’t call the attacker, so both stepped in leaving another player on the other team open for a pass (lack of communication)…

AND…

Do you see where I’m going?  The next defender, Billy, took away the middle, instead of the line (basic defensive tactic to force the other team’s ball movement into traffic), allowing an easy pass down the line to an open winger…

AND…

the outside back, Seth, gave that winger too much time and space to serve a good ball in (not following basic defensive tactic to pressure the winger)…

AND…

The center back, Blaine, left a guy wide open to receive (ball watching) and go 1v1 with the goalie.

There were 5 And’s leading up to that goal. Each AND represents a mistake made by one or more field players.

Great if the keeper makes the save, but don’t expect it to happen every time. 1v1 against the goalie is a high percentage shot. It’s a big goal. The keeper won’t save all those.

So, as we’re learning this game, when the other team gets a scoring chance, ask yourself what you and your teammates could have done differently to prevent that chance.

Good and bad teams make lots of mistakes. The difference is that good teams don’t often make 4-5 mistakes in a row. They usually get it back under control after 1 or 2.

Getting better in soccer as a team means getting better at not letting those 5 AND’s happen.

The 5 And’s also apply to real life. Many bad things (and sometimes good things) result from cascading mistakes.

The sump pump in my neighbor’s house has a battery backup. One night, my neighbor happened to be on vacation AND we had an uncommonly high 5-6 inches of rain AND late on a Saturday night a car hit a power pole taking out power to our subdivision AND our subdivision does not yet have a backup feed for the power company to switch over to while they make repairs AND it took the power company over 13 hours to restore power AND that was long enough to drain the battery on the backup and let the sump well overflow into their basement.

My neighbor came home to soggy carpet and flood damage. Take away any of those AND’s and they probably would have avoided a flooded basement.

 

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