Don’t get caught in the justice trap

I enjoyed this post from David Henderson on EconLog about why businesses hire employees and that it is worthwhile to avoid the justice trap.

Henderson quotes good advice from Jeffrey Tucker:

Sincere apologies and genuine admissions of error and wrongdoing are the rarest things in this world. There is no point at all in demanding apologies or in becoming resentful when they fail to appear. Just move on. Neither should you expect to always be rewarded for being right. On the contrary, people will often resent you and try to take you down.

How do you deal with this problem? Don’t get frustrated. Don’t seek justice. Accept the reality for what it is. If a job isn’t working out, move on. If you get fired, don’t seek vengeance. Anger and resentment accomplish absolutely nothing. Keep your eye on the goal of personal and professional advancement, and think of anything that interrupts your path as a diversion and a distraction.

And perhaps a bit more powerful from Walter Oi regarding Japanese internment camps in World War II:

…the Japanese-Americans were treated unjustly, but that the best thing to do for them was to move on and not create a new government program.

I agree. It is very easy to get caught in the justice trap and dwell on how you have been wronged, but that isn’t the least bit productive. Get over it.

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2 thoughts on “Don’t get caught in the justice trap

  1. Mike, I always liked Christopher Hitchens’s observation that: “there is no vileness that cannot be freely uttered by a man whose name is prefaced with the word Reverend.”

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