Small groups with power

I’ve delighted in hearing a local morning radio DJ go crazy recently because her city council refuses to approve a new and popular internet and TV service for the city where she resides, while nearly all surrounding cities have approved it.

She asks, “How is it that two guys can be holding up my consumer choice?” She’s even more put off that it’s not her own city councilman, because she can’t vote against the two hold outs.

This delights me because this particular DJ often goes on a pious rants about what she believes in and it sometimes entails sanctioning government action to force her agenda on people who don’t agree with her and “if you don’t like it, TOO BAD!!! That’s just the way it is!”

I enjoy when I see people like that confront a government action forced on them that they dislike or disagree with. That’s when they seem to discover the problems associated with giving small groups of people too much power.

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5 thoughts on “Small groups with power

  1. “I enjoy when I see people like that confront a government action forced on them that they dislike or disagree with. That’s when they seem to discover the problems associated with giving small groups of people too much power.”

    I’d be willing to bet that the next time things go her way politically she’ll go back to saying things like “if you don’t like it, TOO BAD!!! That’s just the way it is!”

    In my opinion, people who are willing to publicly proclaim emotionally charged things like the above statement (essentially a sophisticated version of the playground nyah-nyah) are not prone to being reasonable or able accept feedback that conflicts with their point of view.

    In fact, she may have a vested business interest in remaining unreasonable. Isn’t shouting about politics (whatever side it may be) big business? Pretty sure people buy more stuff (or listen to more ads) around shouting than they do reasonable discussion.

    • I agree. Sometimes folks never come out of the view of politics as a sport. ‘If we’re in charge, rah, rah! If you’re in charge, boo! But the spoils of govt’ coercion go to the winner!’

      However, in this case, even she mentioned her own inconsistencies. In so many words she said that normally she would be skeptical of the free market and side with government, but now she’s wondering why a couple people should be able to stand in the way of consumer choice.

      • “However, in this case, even she mentioned her own inconsistencies. In so many words she said that normally she would be skeptical of the free market and side with government, but now she’s wondering why a couple people should be able to stand in the way of consumer choice.”

        It’s always nice to see a public figure admit that there is room for learning and change.

        • No doubt. My first attempt at blogging was called ‘Mind Changers’. It was a stupid name, but I was (and still am) very interested in what gets people to change their minds. It just seems like it ought to happen more than it does.

          I think we tend to barricade ourselves into staying rooted into certain ways of thinking which has nothing to do with reason. When we act snide or cocky, it makes it that much harder to admit we were wrong. Sometimes it’s just a matter of who we want to identify with. We may agree with someone, but if we really don’t want to be associated with them, we won’t speak up.

          It goes back to the a couple pots ago, “Discourse”. We don’t know how to do it.

          That reminds me, when the DJ was ranting about the city councilman, rather than discuss possible reasons the councilmen were opposed, she just rattled off list of adjectives, “it’s so ridiculous, repugnant, unacceptable, ludicrous…” just as Jonathon Jacob described.

          • “I think we tend to barricade ourselves into staying rooted into certain ways of thinking which has nothing to do with reason. When we act snide or cocky, it makes it that much harder to admit we were wrong. Sometimes it’s just a matter of who we want to identify with. We may agree with someone, but if we really don’t want to be associated with them, we won’t speak up.”

            Agreed. Change is scary. Accepting feedback is hard when it directly contradicts what we believe. It’s made harder if that belief is connected with our identity and/or our allegiance to a community or group.

            “That reminds me, when the DJ was ranting about the city councilman, rather than discuss possible reasons the councilmen were opposed, she just rattled off list of adjectives, “it’s so ridiculous, repugnant, unacceptable, ludicrous…” just as Jonathon Jacob described.”

            It’s hard to take a moment and imagine why/how someone might take a viewpoint we disagree with. It’s much easier to think they are simply evil, greedy, misguided, ignorant or stupid.

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