Loosely connected cost-benefit analysis?

To my previous post, I can imagine that some people would make the case that sending disruptive kids home from school will increase crime rates, so better to keep them in school.

This is one example of a concept I’ve been thinking about, but don’t have a good name for yet. For the lack of a better name, I’d call it ‘loosely connected cost-benefit analysis’.

This happens when we ascribe benefits, like lower crime rates, to schools because they keep criminals preoccupied. There may be some truth to that, but there are also problems with this reasoning.

First, keeping criminals preoccupied isn’t the purpose of education. Providing an education to students is. The folks who support this second order benefit of using schools to keep criminals off the streets don’t consider the cost that imposes on the school’s primary goal of educating students.

Second, it isn’t fair for the students and parents who want their kids to get an education.

Third, it assumes there are no better ways of dealing with criminals. Isn’t it the job of parents and police to limit criminal activity? I don’t think we gain when we try to offload that responsibility on to schools.

If you think I’m being too narrow-minded and should be more open to all the holistic benefits of schools, I encourage you to consider the following example.

Community centers that promote recreational sports leagues are also a way to keep criminals preoccupied. Though I can’t imagine many people would argue that community centers should be forced to let misbehaving people continue to participate.

I imagine there would be large agreement that community centers have the right and duty to expel dangerous people to keep other members safe and the programs productive. If you agree with that, then why would you think that schools should be forced to keep disruptive students?

Most people could easily predict what would happen if community centers were forced to keep misbehaving people. Community centers would become dangerous, which would chase away well-behaved members and cause eventual failure. The blind spot created when changing ‘community centers’ to ‘schools’ amazes me.

 

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