Good intentions vs. Scams

Politicians use ‘jobs programs’ to get elected. Jobs programs sound good. They help people find jobs, after all, right?

Not always.

As with many government programs, the actual outcome doesn’t always mesh with the well intended, campaign sound bite.

We need more investigative journalists like John Stossel who recently sent his interns to these supposed jobs programs. Here’s a link on Dan Mitchell’s blog about their findings. This is what one intern reported and it sums up the problem well:

“First I went to the Manhattan Jobs Center and asked, “Can I get help finding a job?” They told me they don’t do that. ‘We sign people up for food stamps.’ I tried another jobs center. They told me to enroll for unemployment benefits.”

How can this be?

As I write about often on this blog, it’s all about feedbacks and incentives. I imagine that when these jobs centers were originally funded by a legislative stroke of a pen authorizing the expenditure of taxpayer funds, they did intend to help folks find jobs.

But that same authorization gave birth to a bureaucracy which would become staffed by self-interested (not greedy) folks just like you and I. Over time, the good intention of helping folks find jobs gets subtly replaced with the bureaucracy’s intention of preserving itself.  As Stossel states elsewhere in his piece:

The private market for jobs works better than government “job centers.”

So the staffers at jobs centers look for other ways to be useful to the politicians who fund them. Soon, jobs centers become the front offices for other government programs.

Feedback is the reason I prefer private activities over government activities.

It’s not that I think government activities are inherently evil or bad. I even believe that sometimes government activities can produce value and innovation.

The weakness I see in government activities is that the failure feedback loop is indirect and weak, and sometimes the opposite of what it needs to be.

That means that when the activity does not produce the intended benefits, it can persist, even grow. Sometimes the failure of a government program can attract even more political and taxpayer support to try to fix the failure. That usually leads to an even bigger failure.

The failure feedback loop happens to be more direct and stronger in private activities. Monster.com is a private ‘jobs center’ that works well. Companies with job openings pay to post their jobs on Monster.com because they like the pool of candidates it brings.

If something else does a better job, Monster.com will either have to adapt or it will go out of business. The failure feedback loop is direct and strong.

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