Bottom-up experimentation

The nice thing about having 50 states is that we get to experiment with policies and see what works and what doesn’t.

As individuals, it’s nice to have choices, too. If you’re not happy with your state, rather than struggle to convince more people to vote with you, you can just choose to move to another state that has more attractive policies.

In the Wall Street Journal today, Arthur Laffer and Stephen Moore take advantage of the information we have from the 50 experiments on tax policies to build a persuasive case that lower taxes is good for everyone. I recommend reading, A 50-State Tax Lesson for the President.  Here’s a good snippet:

Every year for the past 40, the states without income taxes had faster output growth (measured on a decadal basis) than the states with the highest income taxes. In 1980, for example, there were 10 zero-income-tax states. Over the decade leading up to 1980, those states grew 32.3 percentage points faster than the 10 states with the highest tax rates. Job growth was also much higher in the zero-tax states. The states with the nine highest income tax rates had no net job growth at all, and seven of those nine managed to lose jobs.

Then there’s the question of in-migration from state to state—or how people vote with their feet. As common sense would dictate, people try to move from anti-growth states and cities to more welcoming climates. There are relevant factors other than tax policy, of course (as in North Dakota today, where the oil boom has brought about the lowest unemployment rate in the nation), but in general the most popular destination states don’t have income taxes. That’s as true recently as it was 40 years ago.

Over the past decade, states without an income tax have seen 58% higher population growth than the national average, and more than double the growth of states with the highest income tax rates. Such interstate migration left Texas with four new congressional seats this year and spanked New York and Ohio with a loss of two seats each.

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3 thoughts on “Bottom-up experimentation

  1. Pingback: Bottoms up experimentation — update | Our Dinner Table

  2. Pingback: Innovation welfare | Our Dinner Table

  3. Pingback: Innovation welfare | Our Dinner Table

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