Good reading

We are lucky enough to get a two-fer from Thomas Sowell this week:

The Progressive Legacy: Part I

Part II

Walter Williams writes about the pathology of low expectations.  Here’s a snippet from his column:

How might one explain the greater civility of Philadelphia and other big-city, predominantly black schools during earlier periods compared with today? Would anyone argue that during the ’40s and ’50s, back when Williams attended Philadelphia schools, there was less racial discrimination and poverty and there were greater opportunities for blacks and that’s why academic performance was higher and there was greater civility? Or how about “in earlier periods, there was more funding for predominantly black schools”? Or how about “in earlier periods, black students had more black role models in the forms of black principals, teachers and guidance counselors”? If such arguments were to be made, it would be sheer lunacy. If white and black liberals and civil rights leaders want to make such arguments, they’d best wait until those of us who lived during the ’40s and ’50s have departed the scene.

Over the past couple of decades, I’ve attended neighborhood reunions. I’ve asked whether any of us recall classmates who couldn’t read, write or perform simple calculations, and none of us does. Back in those days, most Philadelphia school principals, teachers and counselors were white. At Stoddart-Fleisher junior high school, where I attended, I recall that only one teacher was black, and at Benjamin Franklin, there might have been two. What does that say about the role model theory? By the way, Asian-Americans are at the top of the academic ladder, and, at least historically, they rarely experience an Asian-American teacher during their K-through-12 schooling.

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5 thoughts on “Good reading

  1. Pingback: Blame Disorder II | Our Dinner Table

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