Bill Gates is wrong on education

In the Wall Street Journal Opinion Weekend, Jason Riley asks Bill Gates, Was the $5 billion Worth It?

Bill Gates, through his charitable foundation, has sought ways to improve education for 10 years and has failed to produce results.

In this paragraph, Gates seems to rely on some data to back his position:

“We have heavy union states and heavy right-to-work states, and the educational achievement of K-12 students is not at all predicted by how strong the union rules are,” he says. “If I saw that [right-to-work states like] Texas and Florida were running a great K-12 system, but [heavy union states like] New York and Massachusetts have really messed this up, then I could draw a correlation and say it’s either got to be the union—or the weather.”

Immediately following, however, is this paragraph:

Mr. Gates’s foundation strongly supports a uniform core curriculum [i.e. one-size-fits-all] for schools. “It’s ludicrous to think that multiplication in Alabama and multiplication in New York are really different,” he says. He also sees common standards as a money-saver at a time when many states are facing budget shortfalls. “In terms of mathematics textbooks, why can’t you have the scale of a national market? Right now, we have a Texas textbook that’s different from a California textbook that’s different from a Massachusetts textbook. That’s very expensive.”

And later:

Nor does he see the need for competition among state standards. “This is like having a common electrical system. It just makes sense to me.”

So, with unions he relies on data to see if they have any effect on quality.  Yet he seems to want to whack out competition and innovation of curriculum without evidence to support that this would actually drive improvement in education quality.  It just makes sense to him.

I’ve seen quite a few decisions made by folks that just made sense.  They learned shortly thereafter why it didn’t make sense.

I was disappointed the article didn’t mention Gates’ involvement with the Khan Academy.  Ultimately, as with any other market that has evolved over the past few centuries to deliver amazing products, bottoms-up innovation and competition is what drove it.  Khan Academy is disruptive.

Top-down innovation rarely works and often causes massive failures.

The article made it appear like Gates kind of knows this, but he’s too timid to upset the existing rent-seeking constituencies in the education establishment.

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