Jason Whitlock

In Jason Whitlock’s latest Independent Thoughts column, Obama owes Bush an apology, Whitlock asserts that our political discourse is ” substance-less”.

Well, different would be taking responsibility for all the problems he inherited, including our substance-less, counter-productive political discourse, and working toward real change.

The irony.  Whitlock doesn’t seem recognize that his columns are substance-less.   If Whitlock would like some ideas for  discussions with substance, I recommend that the look through the archives of columnists such as Thomas Sowell, Walter Williams, John Stossel and Star Parker and attempt to use his voice to address some of the substantive points they make.

Here’s one recommendation.  Rebut the four column series by Thomas Sowell called Alice in Health Care.   Key substantive point from paragraph 3 of the first column in the series:

One of the biggest reasons for higher medical costs is that somebody else is paying those costs, whether an insurance company or the government. What is the politicians’ answer? To have more costs paid by insurance companies and the government.

In his column, Free Markets: Pro-Rich or Pro Poor, Walter Williams asserts that government intervention in markets is what actually makes it tougher for others to participate:

Restricted, regulated and monopolized markets are especially handicapping to people who are seen as less preferred, latecomers and people with little political clout.

Star Parker makes a point that relates directly to Whitlock’s comment about substance-less discourse in her column, Defining the conservative vs liberal divide.
Rather than seeing government’s job as securing our rights, the liberal sees it to invent them. The politician – or the empathetic judge – defines what is moral and just.
Whitlock, if substance is what you want, what do you have to say about these points?  There’s no shortage of substance filled debate if you care to look for it.
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