“What does being conservative mean?”

I heard a teenager tell Mark Levin, on his radio show, that his Mom asked him this question and he couldn’t give a good answer. The teen wanted to know how Mark would answer.

Mark said a lot. But, I don’t think it would make much sense to non-conservatives. It started off something like, “A conservative believes in individual sovereignty…[I zoned out]…he doesn’t believe in no-government, they’re not anarchists, but a limited constitutional republic…[I zoned out, again]…”

First, I liked hearing this question being discussed. I think questions like this are asked too infrequently. But, yawn. There has to more compelling answer for those who don’t consider themselves conservatives.

Any ideas?

Links

The Wall Street Journal addresses President Obama’s comments, point by point. I’d like to see much more of this from the media with all sides of a debate.

Another week and another must-read from Thomas Sowell. As I read it, I imagined how the 24/7 news media would have treated a Republican doing, or not doing, these things.

Sowell goes further than merely pointing out some things that should cause a voter concern. He educates as to exactly why they should cause you concern.

Warren Buffett just doesn’t get it

Last summer, Warren Buffett wrote an op-ed piece supporting higher taxes on the rich to reduce the deficit.

Warren Buffett speaking to a group of students...

He's Bluffing

Many, including myself and Mitch McConnell, suggested that Warren put his money where his mouth is and make a voluntary contribution to the U.S. Treasury, since he thought so strongly that would help reduce the deficit.

Apparently, in response to our suggestions, Buffett is offering to match any contributions made by Republicans.  He’ll even match 3-to-1 anything contributed by Mitch McConnell.

The only problem is, it makes no sense.

Republicans, and others, who suggested that Buffett make a voluntary donation don’t believe that sending more money to Washington will reduce the deficit.

To believe otherwise ignores the well established record of government spending everything we send them and then some, which is documented by our government’s accumulated national debt and annual deficits.

When I suggested that Buffett make a voluntary donation, I was calling his bluff.  I don’t think Buffett really believes that giving more money to the government will reduce the deficit.

This would be like if I told you that I was 100% certain about the Broncos winning the Super Bowl.

You ask:   If you’re so sure, why don’t you place a big bet on it and make a lot of money?

Me, in my best Buffett impression:  I’ll match anything that you bet.

You:  Why would I bet anything?  I’m not the one who’s 100% confident.  You’re dumb!

Regarding Buffett, our whole point is that if Buffett truly believed his own nonsense, he would put his money where his mouth is.

In fact, he has quite an established record of putting his money where his mouth is.

That’s how he made his billions, by placing BIG bets on investments that he was reasonably confident would pay off.

That’s also what he has done with his philanthropy.  He decided to donate his wealth to charity and to have it spent relatively quickly so that it won’t just feed generations of charity foundation bureaucrats to come.

He is also trying to persuade other billionaires to voluntarily follow his philanthropic model.

So, given his established record of putting his money where his mouth is, why, when it comes to supporting getting more from the wealthy individuals, is his talk so cheap?

More debates like this, please

My family and friends are surprised to find out that I’m not a fan of TV-based political debates.   They figure that since I have an above average interest in politics, television debates must be like my Super Bowl, or something.

I prefer debates like How Much Government is Good Government? between New York Times columnist David Brooks and Representative Paul Ryan.   It’s written.  You can download it and read it on your iPad, Kindle or any device that supports .pdf.

I think TV debates don’t give a true picture of the candidate.  Its like trying to pick a wife while watching ladies perform in a roller derby.

There’s more opportunity in the written format to filter out the shenanigans and articulate a more complete representation of your positions and your criticisms of your opponents’ positions.

I downloaded the Brooks/Ryan debate for my Kindle iPhone app and read about 60% so far.  I’ll have more to say about it soon.

I do recommend it.   If you’re the least bit interested in politics, you will find it easy reading and interesting.